Tag Archives: Liquor

Have You Tried the World’s Most Popular Alcohol?

Jinro is a brand of a South Korean liquor called Soju. Producing 161 million gallons (608 million L) annually Jinro is also the most sold spirit in the world. In fact, it outsells Smirnoff, Bacardi, and Johnnie Walker combined!

Traditionally, Soju is a drink that starts out as rice wine (much like Sake) before getting distilled into a liquor. Today stage 1 of Soju is made not only with rice, but alternatively wheat, barley, potatoes, sweet potatoes, or tapioca.

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James Bond Got This Wrong

In You Only Live Twice—which takes place largely in Japan—James Bond (Sean Connery) tells Tiger Tanaka that he enjoys Sake, “Served at the correct temperature, 98.4°F.”

Though it is commonly held that Sake ought to be served warm, this is misleading. The tradition of serving the drink warm only started to mask the flavors of sub-par brews.

In particular, Sakes fortified with cheap liquor are of the sort to be served warm. Junmai or ‘pure rice’ sake is made without any distilled alcohol added, and ought to be chilled when served.

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Maraschino Cherries Aren’t Italian

Maraschino Cherries originated in Croatia, where Marasca Cherries grow readily. Much like the apples planted by Johnny Appleseed in the American frontier, these cherries are sour and not fit for eating, but readily turn into delicious liquor!

In the 1800s people started throwing leftover sour cherries into the cherry liquor they had made. The result is a delicious cocktail garnish, and Luxardo makes some of the finest examples in the world.

After destruction of their family factory in World Wars I and II the Luxardo family uprooted and moved to Italy. This is why people familiar with Luxardo Cherries look at me funny when I tell them that they are a Croatian product.

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Plum Wine Lies To You

Unlike other fruit wines—which are made from the fruit in their name—Plum Wine is not made from Plums. In fact, it is not even wine!

“Plum Wine” is made from infusing Plums into a vodka-like liquor called Shochu. Originating in Persia, Shochu is liquor distilled from fermented rice, barley, sweet potatoes, buckwheat, brown sugar, and sometimes even more obscure ingredients.

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Billions in Booze Busine$$

Unless no drinking whatsoever goes on in your country, the chances are pretty good that the Booze Industry contributes a great deal of money to your economy. I count myself among the brewers, bartenders, servers, beer distributors, truck drivers, hop farmers, scientists, sales professionals, and marketing specialists who benefit from the $328 billion injected into the U.S. economy courtesy of the Beer Industry in 2017.

While Big Beer lead the way in economic booze-contribution, the Wine Industry weighed in at $220 billion; and the Liquor Industry played the part of $178 billion.

If you have been considering a change in career-scenery, I find this industry proves quite rewarding!

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#5 Unhealthiest Cocktail in America

The good folks at Eat This! Not That! encourage you to avoid Texas Roadhouse’s Frozen Raspberry Margarita.

Number 5 on this list of the Most Unhealthy Drinks in America clocks in at 470 calories, and I can assure you it tastes like an ungodly sweet pile of mush with a tiny bit of liquor thrown in for giggles.

In contrast to the curators of this list, I encourage you to responsibly drink whatever you like—just know that if it is a frozen drink, then your bartender will hate you.

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Captain Henry Morgan Didn’t Drink Rum

In the 1600s the namesake of Captain Morgan Spiced Rum sailed all over the Caribbean pirating & plundering Spanish settlements. Given a mandate from the British crown Captain Henry Morgan was technically a privateer—although he made a living doing very piratey things.

Since the Spanish wine industry convinced the crown to outlaw exports of liquor from its colonies, Spanish settlements in Central & South America never got around to making rum like the British Colonies did. So Captain Morgan & anyone raiding Spanish settlements predominantly consumed what they had on hand: Madeira, Wine, & Brandy.

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