Tag Archives: life

A $4 Million Whiskey Collection is For Sale!

There are six bottles of whiskey sitting on my bar right now. I would not call it a collection, merely several different types that I have not yet finished.

However, one anonymous seller has put up their whiskey collection for auction, and it is valued at $4 million. Macallan scotch comprises a mere $2.7 million of this collection, with some bottles dating back to 1921.

If this sounds like something you need in your life, then the online auction begins on September 27, 2019.

For a glimpse into my bartender life follow me on Snapchat!

Snapcode_MedleyDrinks

Illinois: A 277% Upgrade

To this day I remember the awe in which I found myself when I moved to Illinois 10 years ago. “People here drink so much,” I thought to myself, “I love it!”

I confirmed my observations when I discovered a fun bars per capita statistic. When you compare the number of bars to the number of people in a given state you can draw some conclusions about how much public drinking people do there.

According to this chart I moved from 36th to 13th, and I believe this helps explain why I remained in Illinois, even though I finished school 6 years ago.

For a glimpse into my bartender life follow me on Snapchat!

Snapcode_MedleyDrinks

Adios Long Island. Hola Applebees!

Applebees has taken an old staple for heavy drinking and released a PG-21 version.

Traditionally, the Adios Motherfucker starts out life as a Long Island Iced Tea, but instead of adding Sweet & Sour Mix along with Coca-Cola, you throw in 1 shot of Blue Curaçao, instead. This means the drink is utterly lacks any non-alcoholic component, save the ice.

Applebees now offers a watered down version of this recklessly strong classic. It still boasts a blend of vodka, tequila, rum, gin, triple sec, and blue curaçao—but they lighten the pours so that Sweet & Sour plus Sierra Mist also fit in the glass.

I promise you that this drink will be an underweight sugar-bomb, but through the month of September they cost only $1. In a cute little homage to this drink’s roots—as well as to the passing of Summer—they simply call it, Adios.

For a glimpse into my bartender life follow me on Snapchat!

Snapcode_MedleyDrinks

Cöffeemeister

Coffee has been flirting with the booze-world, of late. Yesterday, I saw a TV commercial for a nitro-cold brew from a prominent coffee company. This means that unlike soda and traditional beer, nitro beverages receive the same bubble-treatment as Guinness.

Next up in this trend, Jägermeister just announced that it has a cold brew variation of its traditional liqueur. Each shot will boast 10% of the caffeine in a cup of coffee, and they add cacao for a dry & earthy chocolate-y-ness.

For a glimpse into my bartender life follow me on Snapchat!

Snapcode_MedleyDrinks

A Still for Every Person in Boston

As we covered recently, it was never illegal to DRINK alcohol during Prohibition: only to make, sell, or transport it. Obviously, this means that at some point people were going to run out of their stockpiles, and need more booze.

Naturally, there were people happy to illegally oblige the thirsty masses, and make more booze. Also naturally, federal agents were out to get them and uphold the law.

During the first 5 years of Prohibition the feds destroyed 696,933 stills. That is more than 1 still for every person in Boston, today.

For a glimpse into my bartender life follow me on Snapchat!

Snapcode_MedleyDrinks

What Did Prohibition Require?

Prohibition in the United States lasted from 1920 – 1933. Its mention conjures up illicit drinking in speakeasies and bloody gangster activities, but do you know what were the official parameters?

The effort that culminated in banning booze in our nation began well before the Civil War (1861-1865). Its proponents were looking to achieve a more moral and productive society, and they thought that keeping people from drinking would solve significant societal ills.

The legislation that resulted in Prohibition was actually quite unsatisfactory to teetotalers (people who do not drink). They saw it as not stringent enough.

At no point during Prohibition was illegal to DRINK alcohol. It was only illegal to make, sell, or transport it. While having a stockpile of alcohol was perfectly legal, however you could not do so at more than 2 residences—and at that one home had to be in the city and one in the country.

There were also medical and religious exemptions. Doctors could actually write prescriptions for booze, and religious leaders could dole it out for official ceremonies.

Plenty of people broke the law to drink during Prohibition, but there were many who imbibed while following the law.

For a glimpse into my bartender life follow me on Snapchat!

Snapcode_MedleyDrinks