Tag Archives: Gin

Adios Long Island. Hola Applebees!

Applebees has taken an old staple for heavy drinking and released a PG-21 version.

Traditionally, the Adios Motherfucker starts out life as a Long Island Iced Tea, but instead of adding Sweet & Sour Mix along with Coca-Cola, you throw in 1 shot of Blue Curaçao, instead. This means the drink is utterly lacks any non-alcoholic component, save the ice.

Applebees now offers a watered down version of this recklessly strong classic. It still boasts a blend of vodka, tequila, rum, gin, triple sec, and blue curaçao—but they lighten the pours so that Sweet & Sour plus Sierra Mist also fit in the glass.

I promise you that this drink will be an underweight sugar-bomb, but through the month of September they cost only $1. In a cute little homage to this drink’s roots—as well as to the passing of Summer—they simply call it, Adios.

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Triassic Gin

Traditionally, Gin gets its flavor from the pine cones of the Juniper tree—which can live for 200 years.

This is pretty rare in the world of drinkable-horticulture, but Juniper is native to North America, Europe, and Asia. Juniper evolved 250 million years ago during the Triassic period. At this time all of Earth’s landmass was concentrated in 1 enormous continent: Pangea.

In essence, gin is the ultimate multi-cultural spirit.

 

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Do You Need Bacon-Chocolate Shot Glasses?

Some people are tired of ground-breaking bacon news. While that is okay, this post is not for them. I have combined bacon with gin, maple syrup, and an orange slice with favorable results, and this development has my bartender brain alight with possibilities.

Through The Eyes Of My Belly has a recipe for shot glasses made out of bacon & chocolate. The bacon is roasted around a shot-glass mold, and when the melted chocolate solidifies around the inside it seals all the holes, so that your booze stays put.

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Are Boozy Rice Cakes a Thing?

In the 1970s French anthropologist Igor de Garine sat down to dinner in Terengganu (a Malaysian state) and remarked that the rice cakes tasted like gin!

Topai—or fermented rice cake—is made by steaming rice with local yeast before wrapping small cake-sized portions in leaves of the rubber tree, and leaving it out in the heat for several days.

When served, topai will be mildly & delightfully alcoholic!

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France Made England Love Dutch Gin

War. What is it good for? Well frankly, it is good for Gin sales in England. Throughout history England and France have faced off in approximately 800,023 different wars. While trade between the two nations prospered between conflicts, war brought on emargoes of each other’s national products.

When England outlawed the import of French Brandy in 1733 the people naturally still wanted liquor. Thus, they turned to Dutch Gin to satisfy their desire for inebriation. Their affinity for Gin exists to this day, and for this reason.

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New Gins That Aren’t Pine-y

Gin has come a very long way since you tried sneaking some from your grandparents’ spice cabinet, and you are certainly not alone if you did not care for the overwhelming pine tree flavor.

The European Union requires that all Gin made under its domain taste like that. In recent years Gin makers on other continents have been toying with the ingredients, and many of them do not even taste remotely of Pinesol!

Los Apóstoles is a gin made in Argentina, and instead of just the Juniper Berries (that give traditional gin its pine tree flavor) this beautiful spirit is made with coriander seeds, peppermint, eucalyptus, yerba mate, and pink grapefruit.

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Here’s Why Most Liquors Have A 40% A.B.V.

Sure, liqueurs like your Frangelico and your Peach Schnapps are going to have a 15-22% A.B.V. (Alcohol By Volume). And yes, some stronger liquors boast an alcohol content of 62-72%. Bacardi 151 jumps to mind!

But have you ever noticed that the vast majority of your run-of-the-mill-spirits sit at 40% A.B.V.? Chances are the last whiskey, gin, vodka, rum, or tequila that you ordered had an alcohol content of 40%.

Liquor emerges from the still at nearly 100%—which is far too potent for both practicality, as well as most peoples’ taste. So distillers water the booze down to 40%—which is the benchmark simply because it is the lowest A.B.V. legally allowed (without being labeled a liqueur).

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