Tag Archives: Barley

What was Ameria’s First Whiskey?

As a crop Rye is difficult to harvest, and even more difficult to make into booze. However, the tenacity it displays allows Rye to be planted in late fall, survive harsh winters, and be the first grain ready to harvest in spring.

Corn, Wheat, Barley, and Rice were domesticated by humans between 9,000 – 10,000 years ago. Our ancestors did not cultivate Oats until 4,500 years ago. The last of the cereal grains to be domesticated was Rye: only 2,500 years ago.

Even though it showed up late to the party, Rye made America’s first whiskey. Settlers of New England tried growing wheat & barley, but these crops do not like the poor weather & soil conditions found throughout New England.

For a glimpse into my bartender life follow me on Snapchat!

Snapcode_MedleyDrinks

Have You Tried the World’s Most Popular Alcohol?

Jinro is a brand of a South Korean liquor called Soju. Producing 161 million gallons (608 million L) annually Jinro is also the most sold spirit in the world. In fact, it outsells Smirnoff, Bacardi, and Johnnie Walker combined!

Traditionally, Soju is a drink that starts out as rice wine (much like Sake) before getting distilled into a liquor. Today stage 1 of Soju is made not only with rice, but alternatively wheat, barley, potatoes, sweet potatoes, or tapioca.

For a glimpse into my bartender life follow me on Snapchat!

Snapcode_MedleyDrinks

Plum Wine Lies To You

Unlike other fruit wines—which are made from the fruit in their name—Plum Wine is not made from Plums. In fact, it is not even wine!

“Plum Wine” is made from infusing Plums into a vodka-like liquor called Shochu. Originating in Persia, Shochu is liquor distilled from fermented rice, barley, sweet potatoes, buckwheat, brown sugar, and sometimes even more obscure ingredients.

For a glimpse into my bartender life follow me on Snapchat!

Snapcode_MedleyDrinks

George Washington’s Whiskey Recipe

In 1797 George Washington finally caved and let his Scottish farm manager begin to distill whiskey on his sprawling estate in Virginia. Two years later he made 11,000 gallons (41,639 L).

In 2007 the distillery at Mount Vernon was rebuilt, and shortly thereafter whiskey began to flow from its hallowed grounds, once again. The recipe calls for a grainbill of 60% Rye, 35% Corn, and 5% Barley.

For a glimpse into my bartender life follow me on Snapchat!

Snapcode_MedleyDrinks

Potatoes are from Peru

In 1809 the Polish publication The Perfect Distiller and Brewer declared that potatoes make for the worst quality of Vodka. Unlike the starches in Cereal Grains (barley, wheat, rye, etc…) the starches in Potatoes do not easily convert in to the sugars that yeast can digest.

By the way, Potatoes are native to Peru. They did not become a mainstay in Europe until the mid 1700s—just 60 years before the above scathing review of Potato Vodka was published.

For a glimpse into my bartender life follow me on Snapchat!

Snapcode_MedleyDrinks

Early America Drank Maple Beer

Most species of Maple Trees are native to Asia. Our early American predecessors were happy that the Sugar Maple originated in North America, however.

A beer recipe dating back to 1838 calls for brewing with: Maple Syrup, Barley, and Hops—before cask-aging it.
BFD_03.02.19_His.Colonial Maple BeerSnapchat

Cassava Beer

While Barley is widely grown around the world, it does not grow everywhere, and to people in developing nations beer made from importing Barley is prohibitively expensive.

The parent company of Miller developed a nice solution to provide less expensive beer of good quality throughout Africa—and they created 1,500 jobs there to do it. In 2011 SABMiller started brewing affordable beer out of Africa’s most widely grown crop: Cassava.

Cassava is a massive root. In its natural state the Cassava root is poisonous, but through proper preparation it has made for an inexpensive (and safe) dietary staple on two continents for many years. Now it provides less expensive and safer alcoholic alternatives to unlicensed bathtub-booze.

bfd_02.01.19_fac_sabmiller_casavabeer